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Massive Profits in 7 Minutes or Less

Massive Profits in 7 Minutes or LessJim Fink’s proprietary Velocity Profit Multiplier just zeroed in on a trade that could hand you 172% gains. In 60 days or less. That’s not conjecture or wishful thinking. In the last 12 months alone, his system delivered 29 triple-digit winners—along with dozens of double-digit winners—to a small group of investors. And now he’s agreed to share it with 100 new people. Here’s how to get in on the action.

 

5 Investing Statements That Make You Sound Stupid

During my three decades as a financial analyst, I’ve encountered a lot of foolish investment assertions.

Albert Einstein said: Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I’m not sure about the former.

It’s my civic duty to make you a better investor. Here are five of the dumbest investing statements I’ve ever heard. Each is followed by a remedial lesson. These phrases are common but deadly for your portfolio.

See if you can read my list, without wincing.

1) “I wouldn’t buy stocks right now because the market is performing badly.”

Don’t watch market fluctuations too closely. If you put your money into inherently strong companies, they’ll be fine 10, 20 or 30 years from now. Bull and bear markets come and go. Equities as a whole rise over the long haul.

2) “I bought a mutual fund that tracks a broad market index. That’s all the diversification I need.”

Diversification is important. Investing in a mutual fund pegged to, say, the S&P 500 is a good start. But it’s not enough. You should also diversify among categories of stocks, bonds, interest-earning investments, real estate, international equities, etc.

3) “I just bought a stock and it’s tanking. I’m gonna cut my losses and dump it.”

Checking the performance of your portfolio or a single stock on a frequent basis is a recipe for losing money. Keep sight of your strategic investment goals.

Once you’ve bought a stock with solid fundamentals, remain patient. Don’t get rattled by temporary setbacks and the inevitable ups and downs. Own companies with strong fundamentals and undervalued share prices.

4) “My broker is a genius. He’ll make me a fortune.”

If there’s any recurring theme in this newsletter, it’s the need for you to think for yourself. Many brokers are reputable, honest and hardworking. But not everything a broker does is to your benefit. There can be some self-interest built into a broker’s advice.

Falling for bad advice can wreck your returns. You must arm yourself with information that’s objective and based on the facts, not advice from someone who makes a living from commissions. Do your own homework.

5) “The investing rules are different this time around.”

Oh boy. Number five is particularly harmful. Certain immutable laws govern the economy and financial markets. They don’t change over time. It’s like saying “gravity doesn’t always apply” and jumping off a roof.

Pick a fairly valued company that you understand. Make sure it’s selling products and services that people need. Insist on a solid balance sheet. Keep an eye on economic cycles. Beware of excessive valuations. An investor who says time-tested rules no longer matter is a sheep about to get fleeced.

As Forrest Gump might say, in surveying this sampling of investing misconceptions: “Stupid is, as stupid does.”

Have you overheard (or in a weak moment uttered) a really dumb remark about investing that you’d like to share? Drop me a line at: mailbag@investingdaily.com

The next Apple…

The fast-moving technology sector seems to attract the smartest…and the dumbest…money. I’m reminded of this staggeringly obtuse statement, uttered by someone who should have known better:

“There is no reason anyone would want a computer in their home.”

As Homer Simpson would say: D’oh! Those words were spoken in 1977 by Ken Olson, the founder of Digital Equipment Corp. (DEC), about the burgeoning personal computer industry and its stocks.

As upstarts such as Apple (NSDQ: AAPL) soared, revolutionized society, and made billions of dollars, Olson never was able to re-position his once-mighty company, which made “minicomputers” for businesses.

Over the years the floundering company’s assets were sold to various other companies, such as Compaq. DEC merged in 2002 with Hewlett Packard (NYSE: HPE), which ceased to use the DEC name and later encountered its own woes.

Are you looking for the next Apple? Our investment team continually looks for companies in the vanguard of breakthrough technologies. You can stay on top of the latest opportunities by following the chief investment strategists of Investing Daily.

John Persinos is managing editor of Personal Finance and chief investment strategist of Breakthrough Tech Profits.

 

 


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“A Staggering 14,852% Return!”

For over a year, we’ve been sending out a short email each week to a small group of investors with the goal of delivering triple-digit gains in less than 60 days.

And in the last 12 months, we’ve come through for them 30 times!

Plus, over the same period of time, we’ve also shown them dozens of double-digit winners, too.

Those on the receiving end of these recommendations are so happy about their gains, they’ve flooded my inbox with notes like this one from Noel A., who says…

“My annualized return is a staggering 14,852.3%!!”

Best of all, our Profit Multiplier system, which generates the two simple sentences of instructions responsible for these results, has just hit on three new trades, and each one could hand you fast gains of 150% or more.

But here’s the thing: The timing here is crucial. And the window to get in on the action is closing fast.

So if you’re even remotely interested in doubling your money three times in the coming weeks, you need to watch this brief video.

You’ll not only discover how this system works, you’ll also learn what you need do to take part in the trades it’s pinpointed.

You can watch it here.

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